Early Symptoms of HIV & AIDS

Based on just symptoms, you can’t tell if you really have HIV. You can find this out if you get tested for HIV. Once you know your status, making healthy decisions will be easier for you. Different people show different symptoms of the disease. Moreover, the symptoms also vary based on the stage of the HIV. Given below is a description of some common symptoms of this disease.

Early Stage of HIV

Typically, 9 out of 10 people with this disease show flu-like symptoms within a few weeks of infection. Some people don’t feel sick at this stage. They have acute HIV infection. Common symptoms include fatigue, mouth ulcers, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, muscle aches, night sweats, chills, rash and fever, just to name a few. If you have these symptoms, chances are that you have HIV. For confirmation, however, we suggest that you contact a good doctor.

Clinical Latency Stage

If left untreated, the patient may move onto the next stage known as the clinical latency stage or chronic HIV infection. At this stage, the disease is active but the reproduction level is very low. The symptoms are also mild.

If you don’t take medicine to treat the disease at this stage, you may move onto the next stage within 10 years or so. In some people, the disease gets worse a lot faster. However, if you get treatment, this stage may last longer since the drugs can control the growth of the virus giving you more time.

Here, it’s important to keep in mind that you can still transmit the disease to people around you at this stage even if you show no symptoms. However, if you are on ART, you are not as likely to get the disease transmitted to others. So, you have to be careful and get the required treatment as soon as possible.

Progression to AIDS

If you don’t take meds for HIV, the virus will make your immune system a lot weaker. As a result, you will get AIDS, which is the last stage of this disease. Below are some symptoms of the disease:

  • Weight loss
  • Night seats or fever
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Inflammation of the lymph glands
  • Prolonged diarrhea
  • Pneumonia
  • Sores of the genitals, anus or mouth
  • Depression, memory loss or neurologic disorders

However, keep in mind that the symptoms listed above are not necessarily the indicators of HIV. They may also be related to other common diseases. Therefore, we suggest that you run some tests in order to find out which disease you have. The tests won’t cost you much and help you know the disease you have.

Most of the severe symptoms of the disease appear because of the opportunistic infection, which is the result of weakened immune system.

So, if you have been experiencing the symptoms listed in this article, we suggest that you get in touch with a doctor for your medical checkup. The doctor will prescribe some tests that can confirm whether you have HIV or not.

How STD Symptoms Affect The Body & That Tell You The Sexually Transmitted Disease You Have

Are you in a panic and scared thinking you have a sexually transmitted disease? Playing the guessing game is not a sensible thing to do. Doing this will only add more unnecessary stress for you to cope with, and that’s not good. Any STD has to be identified professionally to get the appropriate help and treatment. This can only be after seeing a doctor who will verify the disease you think might have happened.

Lots of cases of men and women they tend to over think a condition and fear the worse. These same people have been proven wrong after consulting a doctor who identified that they in fact have a yeast infection not a sexually transmitted disease.

Okay you’re concerned that something is not right down below. What makes you think this has your vagina or penis become itchy? Has a rash developed around the genitals? Do you have an unusual smelly discharge? Have you got swollen testicles? Have scabs formed or inflammation and soreness? Yes these symptoms do relate to certain STDs but, some connect with infections such as bacterial vaginosis and thrush which is not an STD. Self diagnosis is not advisable.

The word STD can be frightening but these days they are treated successfully and painlessly depending on severity.

Chlamydia in females normally brings pain or a burning sensation when urinating. Vaginal discharge is not uncommon. Chlamydia is known to cause pain in the lower abdomen during or after sexual intercourse.Sexual intercourse and between menstrual cycles is a time also when a woman may experience bleeding. Just like women, the Chlamydia infection in men they too suffer pain or burning sensation when urinating. Discharge also from the tip of the penis where it appears white, cloudy or watery. Testicle pain is likely.

Genital warts develop on or around the anal or genital region resembling small fleshy growths. Warts are reasoned by the human papilloma virus (HPV). Genital warts are not known to cause pain but yes to itch and redness. Not every case but bleeding is another patients concern.

Genital herpes: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is responsible for this infection. It’s typical to suffer the symptoms of HSV as early as a couple of days after contact with the virus. Painful sores blister like develop and could be itchy, or have you feel a tingling. Urinating can be uncomfortable.

Gonorrhoea is commonly connected with pain or a burning sensation when urinating. A woman’s vaginal discharge is something widely known to help a doctor identify this infection. Usual discharge appears watery, yellow or green. During sexual intercourse women tend to feel pain in the lower abdomen and possibly bleeding. Male gonorrhoea symptoms are similar to a woman’s. For instance: pain or a burning feeling urinating. Discharge a white, yellow or green from the tip of the penis. Testicle soreness is anticipated with this infection.

Syphilis is a bacterial infection that brings a highly infectious sore on the genitals and in the early stage of development is painless. Secondary syphilis symptoms are likely to be an irritating rash, flu-like sickness. Patchy hair loss could happen. Within a few weeks these symptoms could go.The more serious downside is the heart can be seriously affected in the late or tertiary stage of syphilis. Also paralysis and blindness two other concerns.

Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection brought about by a tiny parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis. Trichomoniasis is recognised by the unpleasant smelly frothy yellow or watery vaginal discharge it causes as well as tenderness, itch, and pain usually during the time the patient urinates. This infection rarely causes symptoms. Men can expect pain or burning passing urine, a whitish discharge from the penis tip, or an inflamed foreskin for fear those symptoms do come.

What Are the Symptoms, Diagnostic Methods and Treatment Options for STDs?

Sexually transmitted diseases

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) or sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or venereal diseases (VD) occur due to transfer of infectious organism during a sexual contact. STDs occur due to harmful bacteria, parasites, yeast, and viruses. Sometimes, STDs occur due to spreading of the organisms from a mother to infant during childbirth or during breast-feeding by the use of unsterilized drug needles, and during blood transfusions.

Some specific types of STDs are:

Bacteria-related STDs

  • Chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis)
  • Gonorrhea (Neisseria gonorrhea)
  • Syphilis (Treponema pallidum)
  • Chancroid (Haemophilus ducreyi)

Viruses-related STDs

  • Crabs, also known as pubic lice
  • Hepatitis B and D, and infrequently, A*, C*, E* (hepatitis viruses, types A-E)
  • Genital herpes (herpes simplex virus)
  • Genital warts (human papillomavirus virus [HPV])
  • HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus [HIV virus])
  • Molluscum contagiosum* (poxvirus)

Protozoan-related STDs

  • Trichomoniasis (Trichomonas vaginalis)

Parasites-related STDs

  • Pubic lice or crabs (Pediculosis pubis)

Fungi-related STDs

  • Yeast infections (Candida albicans)

Genital areas are generally moist and warm and are ideal environments for the growth of yeasts, viruses, and bacteria etc.

Symptoms of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

  • Painful ulcers on the genitals
  • Rashes, fever, headache and cough, achy joints
  • Recurring outbreaks of blister-like sores on the genitals
  • Fatigue, night sweats, chills
  • Sore throats, swollen lymph nodes
  • Weight loss
  • Diarrhea
  • Strong vaginal odor
  • Vaginal itching or irritation and painful urination
  • Serious complications of AIDS including unusual infections or cancers, weight loss, intellectual deterioration (dementia), and death

During transmission, the chances of disease transfer depend on the donor carrying the infection and on the carrier. For example, in case of herpes, HSV 2 transmission probability is:

  • Herpes male to non herpes female = 10%
  • Herpes female to non herpes male = 4%.

Some STDs, such as genital herpes and HIV, that cause AIDS cannot be cured but can only be controlled with medication.

For the treatment of STDs,

  • antibiotics are more commonly preferred in case of bacterial infection
  • for viruses, antiviral medications or anti-retroviral therapy is given

Diagnosis methods

  • Blood tests: Blood tests help to confirm the diagnosis of HIV and AIDS or sometimes the later stage of syphilis.
  • Urine samples: Sometimes, STDs can be confirmed with a urine sample.
  • Fluid samples: In case of active genital sores, fluid and samples from the sores are collected to be tested to diagnose the type of infection. In some cases, laboratory tests of samples from a genital sore or discharge are used to diagnose some STIs (sexually transmitted infections).
  • Pregnant women are screened to avoid the infection transfer to the baby

Treatment and prevention for STDs

  • Antibiotics: Antibiotics can cure many sexually transmitted bacterial and parasitic infections, including gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia and trichomoniasis. But, there is always a possibility that the infection might reoccur.
  • Antiviral drugs: Antiviral drugs reduce the risk of infection, but there is still a possibility that the infection can occur again. Antiviral drugs can keep HIV infection in check for many years, but the virus persists and can still be transmitted, though the risk is lower.
  • As early a treatment is given, the more effective it is.
  • Healthcare professionals refer to safer sex to reduce the risk of STDs, such as the use of condoms during a sexual activity. But safer sex methods cannot always provide complete protection from an STI.
  • Avoid contact during transfer of and exposure to bodily fluids, such as blood transfusions and other blood products, sharing injection needles, sharing tattoo needles, etc.
  • Abstinence is avoiding or stopping from any sexual act with an affected person and is the most effective way to avoid an STI.
  • Monogamy to one uninfected partner: A long-term, monogamous relationship with one person lowers the risk of contracting an STI.